Progressive Grocer

Grocerant February 2017

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5 SOLUTIONS FEBRUARY 2017 N ow that Sriracha, the legend- ary Thai hot sauce, has hit its peak in the United States, what's the next chili condiment ready to take American palates by storm? Korean gochujang is one good bet, according to Chicago-based research firms Technomic and Datassential. Like Sriracha, go- chujang combines red chilies and salt, but its tanginess comes from fermented soybeans, and it gets some sweet notes from glutinous rice. Unlike Sriracha, gochujang is a dense paste usually diluted with vinegar or other ingredients to create a sauce. Gochujang is getting a boost from Chef David Chang of New York City's Momofuku restaurant. Last year Chang began bottling a Korean gochujang-based ssäm sauce, de- scribed as a deep red, spicy, umami-rich seasoning that has been a staple in Momofuku's kitchens since 2004. Chang's website notes that "the spiciness of the Korean chilies in ssäm sauce is balanced for a subtle heat with a tangy and complex flavor. We think it makes everything taste better, especially pizza." Looking beyond gochujang, McCormick & Co.'s latest annual Flavor Forecast report points to Indonesian sambal sauce, another combination of chilies, rice vinegar and garlic, as an emerging sauce to watch. Technomic also sees sambal's potential, noting that the condiment can be utilized in a variety of ways, including in aioli and as a dipping sauce. Recently, sambal appeared on the menu at Legal Sea Foods restaurants in a Raw Oyster & Tuna Crudo with sambal and sesame dressing. For more hot sauce forecasting, there's Ten Ten Pié, a modest market/lunch counter in Portland, Maine. Here, daily bento box lunches, soups, steamed buns and pastries draw fans from around the city, and large tubs of gochujang sit beside petite jars of crunchy garlic in chili oil and other bottled delicacies. Co-owner Atsuko Fu- jimoto, a baker who has worked in some of Portland's best kitchens, sees the next hot sauce in yuzu kosho, a Japanese paste of green or red chilies, fermented with salt and the zest and juice from yuzu, an Asian citrus. magazine is predicting the same, calling yuzu kosho "the secret weapon chefs are putting on everything." Fujimoto notes that "the citrus makes this one different. It's very fresh while still having that fermented flavor." And, like Sriracha a decade ago, "all the cool chefs use it," he says. G — Kathy Hayden Gochujang is a dense paste usually diluted with vinegar or other ingredients to create a sauce. Indonesian sambal can serve as a dipping sauce. Gochujang is getting a boost from Chef David Chang of New York City's Momofuku restaurant. The next Sriracha? ASIAN CHILI SAUCE

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