Progressive Grocer

SEP 2016

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148 | Progressive Grocer | Ahead of What's Next | September 2016 Nonfoods General Merchandise A new generation of dig new generation of digital health-monitoring devices has emerged, devices has emerged, foreshadowing the future of health care and wellness. Retailers with strong positions in health and wellness will have opportuni- ties to cash in on the technical advances and device proliferation as they develop from consumer to medical markets or vic from consumer to medical markets or vice versa, according to industry analysts. Biometric tracking is approaching a crossroads between personal health (sports crossroads between personal health (sports and fitness trackers) on one end and clini- cal health (blood pressure and blood gluco cal health (blood pressure and blood glucose meters) on the other. Just how it all converges at retail, both Just how it all converges at retail, both in HBC aisles and behind the counter, isn't yet clea aisles and behind the counter, isn't yet clear, but the potential is big. IHS Technology, an Englewood, Colo.-based global information company, valued the U.S. mar- ket for consumer medical devices at $3.3 billion in 2015, growing at 5.2 percent CAGR through 2020. e category comprises activity trackers; pedom- eters; blood glucose meters; blood pressure moni- tors; heart rate monitors; pulse oximeters; TENS devices (electro nerve stimulation); nebulizers, patches; body composition analyzers; thermometers; hearing aids; personal scales; pregnancy tests; and fertility test kits. More digital health device manufacturers will make the upgrade to medical-grade products. at means approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, according to Roeen Roashan, IHS senior digital health analyst. San Francisco-based Fitbit, which sold 21.4 million activity trackers last year and has begun tackling quality and accuracy issues, is moving in this direction, according to news reports. Measures of Success Retailers await the impact of advanced devices to shape health and wellness. By Christina Veiders at's important, says Roashan, because "once you have you have data integrity, it's no longer a device for data you have data integrity, it's no longer a device for integrity, you have data integrity, it's no longer a device for it's you have data integrity, it's no longer a device for no longer you have data integrity, it's no longer a device for a device you have data integrity, it's no longer a device for for you have data integrity, it's no longer a device for sports or fitness purposes only. Doctors can use it to draw conclusions based on the data." Medical-grade devices are likely to be covered by insurance companies, while consumer-grade devices are likely not to be covered. For now, smart retailers are trying to capitalize on the burgeoning market of connected digital health devices. Connected Health As part of its positioning on wellness and innovation, Minneapolis-based Target, which has converted its pharmacies to the CVS Health banner, has rolled out Connected Health sections in the pharmacy areas of 550 stores. Target is also focused on elevating its food assortment to fresh and organic products as part of new initiatives unveiled last year. e 6-foot Connected Health sets feature about 14 medical-grade devices, including Quell, a wearable nerve stimulation device from Waltham, Mass.-based Neurometrix that also measures sleep. Once you have data integrity, it's no longer a device for sports or fitness purposes only. Doctors can use it to draw conclusions based on the data." —Roeen Roashan, IHS Technology

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